Category Archives: COP19

CDL catches up with Brianna Craft, a Brown and CDL alum in Warsaw

By Sophie Purdom

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Early Thursday morning as harried negotiators streamed into the National Stadium, we sat down with a composed research assistant to the LDC Group. Brianna Craft had already been at work for hours before, supporting her boss in breaking negotiations and backdoor deals. “We stay here practically all night,” she confessed.

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UN Climate Negotiations: Indigenous Resistance from Within

By Camila Bustos

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In 2009, Members of Indigenous Organizations Including COICA Gathered to Form a Human Banner. Photo Credit: http://www.galdu.org

As climate finance and “loss and damage” payments dominated the agenda at last November’s United Nations climate change negotiations in Warsaw, Poland, indigenous peoples’ groups fought to be heard.

One of the most vocal and visible indigenous groups at the UN climate talks, COICA (The Coordinator of Indigenous Organizations of the Amazon) was founded in 1984 as the umbrella group for more than 350 indigenous organizations in nine different countries. It works to address issues of human rights, self-determination, and natural resource protection.

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The CDL’s policy briefings and scholarly articles from 2013

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The following post provides a list of the CDL’s latest policy reports and scholarly articles published in 2013:

Scholarly Articles

2013 “No Talk, but Some Walk: The Obama Administration’s First Term Rhetoric on Climate Change and its International Climate Budget Commitments.” Graciela Kincaid and J. Timmons Roberts. Global Environmental Politics 13(4) November, 2013. Available online here.

2013 “The impact of climate change on human security in Latin America and the Caribbean” Úrsula Oswald Spring, Hans Günter Brauch, Guy Edwards and J. Timmons Roberts in Climate change and Human Security Handbook, Michael Redclift and Marco Grasso (eds.) Cheltenham: Edward Elgar. More information available here.

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Climate Finance at COP19: A Post-Mortem

By Alexis Durand 

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Photo: Push Europe

Activists lay down in the halls of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Warsaw, Poland last week, forming the letters “W.T.F.” with their bodies.  The letters stood for “Where’s The Finance?,” and their message was clear – the failure to revamp the funding to help developing countries green their economies and prepare for climate change impacts had turned the conference into a deep disappointment.

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Can Chile balance growth and climate action?

By Alison Kirsch and Guy Edwards 

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Chile is at a crossroads. Copper prices are falling, the gap between energy supply and demand is widening, and in December the second round of presidential elections will determine who will lead Chile in the next administration. Chile faces a difficult balancing act to maintain its strong economic growth and the energy this requires, while ensuring progress on its climate, environmental and clean energy goals. In this whirlwind of domestic change, Chile has the opportunity to reaffirm its position as a global leader on climate change.

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Were Those Cheers or Jeers? Warsaw Leaves Doubts on Support for Developing Countries to Address Climate Change

By Timmons Roberts 

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The shouting began just before 7 p.m. on what was supposed to be the last day of the COP19 (19th Conference of the Parties) negotiations inside the vast temporary metal and fabric plenary rooms constructed right on the soccer field in Warsaw, Poland’s national stadium. At first, the shouting from activists outside in the bleachers sounded like football cheers, but then they grew in volume.

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Corporate Influences Silence Voices Demanding Progress at COP19

By Bryna Cofrin-Shaw

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At 5 pm on November 23rd, 2013, the Warsaw stadium hosting this year’s UN Climate Conference, COP19,  erupted in applause. The room, packed with party delegates and observers who had already worked through the final night and into the next evening showed enormous relief that some progress had been made. The progress in question? To adopt a future mitigation agenda “inviting” parties to initiate “preparations” for intended nationally determined contributions. In other words, No emissions targets, no pledge and review process, not even commitments.

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